Monday, August 31, 2009

Hiawatha Trail

Mountain Biking
Location: Idaho/Montana Border, near Lookout Pass
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~15 miles, one way
Difficulty: Easy


The Hiawatha Rail-Trail has been called one of the most scenic stretches of railroad grade in the country. The Route of the Hiawatha is a scenic section of abandoned railroad grade from the Milwaukee Road that The Taft Tunnel Preservation Society and the U.S. Forest Service have turned into a world-class non-motorized trail.

A truly unique and historic experience everyone can enjoy, the trail takes you back to the turn of the century when the Milwaukee Road constructed the last transcontinental railroad in the United States. This magnificent rail-trail winds over the rugged Bitterroot Mountains between Idaho and Montana, along one of the most scenic routes in the Pacific Northwest.

The trial passes through eleven tunnels and over nine trestles, towering hundreds of feet above the valley floor. The Route of the Hiawatha is best known for the long, dark St. Paul Pass or "Taft" Tunnel, which burrows for 1.8 miles under the state line. The best part of this trail, IT'S ALL DOWNHILL!

Currently, fifteen miles of trail are now open to the public with another 31 miles under construction. When finished, a rider will be able to ride from St. Regis, Montana to Pearson, Idaho (46 miles total). You can ride or hike the trail any time between 8:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. from May to October. The trail is operated and maintained with fees collected from all users.

All users are required to purchase and display their tickets at all times. Tickets can be purchased on the trail from the Trail Marshal or at Lookout Pass Ski Resort. There is a shuttle bus to transport you and your bike between Roland & Pearson trailheads.

Tunnels are very dark, so all users must have lights and helmets to ride the trail. Adult supervision is required for children under the age of 14. Dogs and pets are not allowed on the trail.

NOTE: Bike rental is available at Lookout Pass. At last check prices were for complete package: bike, helmet, and light.

Directions: From Lookout Pass, Montana take I-90 East to the Taft exit #5. From the Taft exit, go past the pavilion and take the Rainy Creek Road #506 approximately 2 miles to the East Portal Trailhead.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Hiawatha Trail


See you on the trail,
--Greg

FRS® Healthy Energy™ is a new kind of healthy energy food that provides sustained energy without the crash. Try FRS Free!*


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Friday, August 28, 2009

Grand Gulch

Backpacking
Location:
Cedar Mesa Plateau, Utah
Duration:
5-7 Day
Season:
Year round
Distance: ~38 miles, one-way
Difficulty:
Moderate


In the Cedar Mesa Plateau of southeastern Utah's red rock canyon country lies Grand Gulch, a major tributary of the San Juan River. Invisible from the plateau, Grand Gulch is a hidden canyon, hundreds of feet deep that stretches south towards the San Juan River.

This trip documents the backpacking section between Collins Spring and Kane Gulch. A 38-mile weeklong trip, where you will camp under sandstone cliffs and discover the cliff dwellings and pictographs of the ancient Anasazi Indians civilization. Campsites can be found all over with only one major concern being water. Note: it's recommended that you check with the Kane Gulch Ranger Station when you purchase your permit for good water sources (individual seasons and times of the year can effect sources).

The route is pretty straight forward with canyon walls on either side and only 2 main navigation points to be aware of. The first is when you enter Grand Gulch from Collins Canyon, just go straight. The second is at Bullet Canyon, where you need to stay left to continue up the Gulch, although Bullet Canyon can be a possible variation for a shorter trip or a bail out point if someone turns an ankle, etc. All other side canyons are pretty much dead ends.

As for the trail, it starts at Collins Spring and quickly enters this immense drainage system with 600ft high canyon walls, freshwater pools and countless ancient ruins (opportunities abound for exploration of the side canyons and ancient ruins throughout the trip). Follow the trail 2 miles down Collins Canyon to the intersection with Grand Gulch. To the right leads you down through the Narrows to the San Juan River, go straight ahead to continue up Grand Gulch and you're on your way.

About 2.25 miles after the junction you should come across Bannister Ruin with its characteristic exposed beams (very fragile). Bannister Spring is located about a quarter mile below Bannister Ruin on the left. Next, you should come to Polly's Island on your left with Polly's Canyon on your right, just continue straight past the Island. About 1.5 miles past Polly's Island you should see the Big Man pictograph on the right about 200ft above the canyon floor.

From here you will pass 3 canyons on your left called Dripping Canyon, Step Canyon (the half way point) and Green Canyon, until you finally reach Bullet Canyon on you right with a heavily used campsite and water. Note: when you get to Bullet Canyon you're over halfway there with another 15 miles to go. Bullet Canyon is about 8 miles long and has two major ruins within its walls called Jailhouse and Perfect Kiva. The ruins are located about 2.5 miles up the canyon and make a nice side excursion from camp.

After Bullet Canyon stay to the left and continue up Grand Gulch. About a mile up the canyon, the first canyon on your right is Sheiks Canyon and contains an abundance of rock art called the Green Mask along with a spring. After you leave Sheiks Canyon, you should pass the rock formation called The Thumb Pour Off. About 4 miles past the Thumb Pour Off, you will come to Split Level Ruin on your left, considered one of the major houses in this canyon.

About 3 miles farther you'll come to Todie Canyon. You'll want to go left to continue up Grand Gulch, but up the canyon to the right about a hundred yards is water. As you continue up Grand Gulch Canyon from Todie Canyon, you will pass two major ruins on your left, the first is called Turkey Pen and the second called Junction. Junction is located about 3 miles after Todie Canyon and a mile after Turkey Pen.

Junction Ruin is a huge alcove that bears John Wetherill's inscription. It marks the junction of where Grand Gulch meets Kane Gulch. Stay right and follow Kane Gulch 4 miles and 500ft in elevation gain to the trail end at Kane Gulch Ranger Station.

You must have a backcountry permit to hike in Grand Gulch. Groups of 8 to 12 must reserve a permit in advance through the Monticello Field Office. DO NOT show up at the trailhead, the ranger station or the Monticello Field Office with a group of 8 or more and expect to get a permit. Some walk in permits (for groups of less than 8 people) for overnight use of the canyons will be available at the Kane Gulch Ranger Station.

Day hikers do not need reservations and can register and pay their fee at the ranger station or the in the fee tube at the appropriate trailhead before entering the canyon. As for safety, be careful of slippery surfaces from water or ice. Know where to find dependable water sources. Watch out for scorpions, black widow spiders and rattlesnakes. The scorpions and black widow spiders have a tendency to hangout in the dry overhangs and dark ruins.

During July, August, and September there is a higher danger of flash floods, but whenever it rains you should always seek high ground. If trapped by a flash food just wait until the water recedes and then be careful of quicksand in the stream channels.

Directions: From Blanding, Utah (about 75 miles south of Moab) head south on 191 ~ 4 miles to the Hwy 95 junction and then take a right on 95 (west). From the junction head west for ~ 28 miles to Hwy 261. At 261 take a left and head south for ~ 4 miles to the Kane Ranger Station and drop off a vehicle. From the Kane Ranger Station backtrack to Hwy 95 north for ~ 4 miles, then take a left on Hwy 95 (west). Drive west on Hwy 95 for ~ 9.5 miles, then at the junction with Hwy 276 take a left and head southwest for ~ 6.5 miles and the Collins Spring turn-off on your left. After the turn-off, travel ~ 2.4 miles to a fork in the road, at the fork stay right. After another ~ 4 miles you will arrive at the Collins Spring trailhead (there is a sign). Make sure to ask for directions at the Kane Ranger Station.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Grand Gulch


See you on the trail,
--Greg

FRS® Healthy Energy™ is a new kind of healthy energy food that provides sustained energy without the crash. Try FRS Free!*


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Bonnie Lake - Canoeing

Canoeing
Location: Near Cheney, Washington
Duration: 2 Day
Season: Spring
Distance: 5 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Easy


Bonnie Lake is a unique lake located in a deep canyon among the rolling hills and sagebrush of Eastern Washington. On the way in all you can see is rolling grass hills forever and then suddenly you drop into this deep canyon to find an incredible little gem of a canoe trip.

The land all around the lake is private, except for an island in the middle of the lake. Because the land all around the lake is private, the only way to gain access to this lake is where the public road crosses over the outlet to the lake.

You must paddle up the outlet to get to the lake and then follow this long narrow lake deep into the canyon until you reach the public island. This is a nice overnight canoe trip for beginner to advance during the spring to early summer when the water is up.

Beginning at the bridge over Rock Creek paddle north, honing your paddling skills on this very narrow creek. At about 1 mile you will reach Bonnie Lake and a large section of lillypads, known for housing lots of turtles. There is no road access to this lake, so everyone you see came in the same way you did.

Paddling out onto the lake, there is a great place for camp in a wooded spot at the south end of the lake, however it's private land and the owner has posted NO CAMPING signs on most of the trees, so please respect the area. The only legal place to camp is on the island about another 1.5 miles up the lake.

There are several spots for a good camp on the island, I prefer the very north end of the island. If your feeling adventurous and have a few more hours of daylight, you can take the scenic portion of this trip to the very north end of this 4.5 mile lake.

As you near the north end of the lake, hug the right side and find the inlet that you can navigate for about another .25 miles. When it becomes too shallow to paddle portage your canoes and find the trail on the right side of the creek. Follow this trail for another .75 miles to the 200ft waterfall. The land owners don't mind the day visits to the waterfall, but be respectful of the land for future use and don't leave any litter.

For pictures, map and more info click on Bonnie Lake


See you on the trail,
--Greg

FRS® Healthy Energy™ is a new kind of healthy energy food that provides sustained energy without the crash. Try FRS Free!*


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Falls Creek Trail

Backpacking
Location: Near Athol, Idaho
Duration: 2-3 Day
Season: Summer - Fall
Distance: ~ 16 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Moderate



If you're looking for a trip during hot weather than this is a "cool" backpacking trip along a mountain stream with shade from the dense canopy of the trees. Located in the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, a land of dense forests, abundant wildlife, scenic mountains and giant cedars, Falls Creek Trail #229 is a great little trip. It starts along the banks of Lake Pend Oreille, the state's largest lake at 94,600 acres and climbs its way up to the summit of Packsaddle Mountain at 6405 feet.

As for the trail, it’s a pretty clean trail that makes approximately a 3700ft elevation gain over 7.5 miles to the summit. There are plenty of primitive campsites along the way and being located in the Falls Creek drainage makes for a nice trip on those hot summer days. You can also drive in part way and start your trip at Falls Creek Mine, shaving about 2 miles off the route.

On the trail, you start out hiking up old logging roads until you reach the Falls Creek Mine. From here the trail dives into the deep forest canopy, winding along the creek and crossing numerous little streams. A little ways after the Mine, the trail begins to narrow down from an old logging road to more like a trail. As it works its way up the drainage it crosses over Falls Creek twice and the second time tit leaves the Creek and begins to switchback up the hill to the top. This is where the climbing really begins.

As you finally near the top, you will come to a few trail junctions. Just read the markers and keep going up hill and you’ll soon be there. At the summit saddle just climb the biggest boulder pile and you’re there.

NOTE: There’s a nice tent spot at the top, but make sure you have some water because there’s none to be found on top of this peak. Fill-up at your last crossing of Falls Creek. Also, if you want, you could combine this trip with the Packsaddle hike and just climb up the eastside of Packsaddle and then descend the westside for an easier ascent, but longer trip.

Directions: From I-90 in Coeur d’Alene Idaho, head north on Highway 95 towards Athol Idaho. Approximately 3 miles before Athol, you will come to Silverwood Theme Park on your right (westside of Hwy 95), there’s a road just before the Park, turn right at this intersection onto Bunco Road (there are signs indicating this turnoff as the Bunco Rd entrance into the National Forest).
  • Follow the road for about 2.3 miles and the signs will direct you to turn left, continue down this road for 1 mile as it then turns right and now 4 more miles to the entrance into the National Forest and the end of the pavement. There’s a big parking lot here for snowmobiles in the winter, just head past it and up the hill on FSR #332. Travel up the hill and along the ridges on FSR #332 for approximately 6 miles until you come to the intersection of FSR #278.
  • Now go left on FSR #278 as it winds its way through the mountains, all the way to the turnoff for Falls Creek Trail, approximately 25 miles. You will drive past Lakeview and about 2.5 miles past Whiskey Rock Bay, you will cross over Falls Creek, the turnoff is just 50ft past it. If you’ve make it to Granite, you’ve gone too far.
For a map, pictures and more info click on Falls Creek Trail


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Deschutes River - Canoeing

Canoeing
Location: Deschutes River, Bend, Oregon
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~3 miles, one way
Difficulty: Easy


The Deschutes River winds it's way down ancient lava canyons and through grassy meadows. This canoe route is just minutes from Bend, OR and suitable for young and old. Navigation is simple with class 1 water (this one could be floated in a tube).
 
This trip is the section between the Slough Access and Dillon Falls (approx. 3 miles).
 
CAUTION: Dillon Falls cannot be run, pay attention for the sign after you pass the big meadow. If you miss the take-out you do have some time to still get out before the Falls, but don't push it.
 
You will need to shuttle, so drop a vehicle at the Dillon Falls parking lot on your way in. There is a hiking trail that parallels the route, so if you have boat problems you can hike out.
 
Pets are allowed on leash and the trail is shared use with mountain bikes and horses. Also, depending on the time of day and season, mosquitoes can be a problem, so bring bug juice.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Deschutes River


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Monday, August 24, 2009

Cascade Campground

Camping
Location:
Near St. Regis, Montana
Duration:
Varies
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance:
N/A
Difficulty:
Easy



Cascade Campground is located in the Lolo National Forest of western Montana. At 2.1 million acres of spectacular mountainous country, this forest is estimated to be the third largest National Forest in the northern region of the USDA Forest Service and contains several major tributaries to the Clark Fork River of the Columbia River Basin.

The location of this campground makes for easy access to numerous outdoor resources including the Clark Fork River with opportunities for fishing and water sports, not to mention the numerous hiking and biking trails in the forests nearby.

This is a beautifully maintained campground with approximately nine sites and one group site. Each site offers a fire ring with a grill, picnic table, parking and even chopped wood. There's potable water, two dumpsters for trash and a pit toilet.

Nearby activities include the Clark Fork River with fishing, rafting and floating. There’s even a kayak surf wave about one quarter mile upstream from the campground. Also, there’s an easy trail up to an overlook on the top of Cascade Falls, a 250’ waterfall. Along with the possibility of using the campground as a take off spot for a backpack trip up to Nine Mile Divide (14 miles).

Over night stays have a fee and groups of 10 and up cost more. There’s a self-pay station located at the information sign, day-use and parking are free with a 14-day limit on stays and all sites on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Bears don’t seem to be a significant problem yet, but they do inhabit the area. So, as always a clean campsite should be kept. However, the squirrels may make off with you lunch if you don’t pay attention.

Directions: Take I-90 to the St. Regis exit #33. Drive North on Highway 135 for 16.5 miles. There is a well-marked sign on your right.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Cascade Campground


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Saturday, August 22, 2009

Deception Pass - Sea Kayaking

Sea Kayaking
Location: Whidbey Island, Washington
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: Play boating spot
Difficulty: Difficult


Deception Pass is one of Washington's favorite spots with visitors flocking to see the spectacular bridge and Pass, making it one of the most visited parks in the nation.
 
Because of Whidbey Island's temperate climate, many birds and waterfowl winter here, including an abundance of bald eagles. Fishing is popular in the area and tent and RV camping are available year round.
 
This area boasts giant old growth forests, 30 miles of hiking trails, 19 miles of saltwater shoreline, 3 freshwater lakes, and 246 campsites. Notable for its unusual variety of water environments, what better way to explore it, than in a kayak?
 
Most people just hop out of the car and head to the center of the Deception Pass Bridge, which connects Whidbey and Fidalgo islands. From that vantage, they snap pictures of sweeping views west toward the Olympic Mountains and east to Mount Baker.
 
But kayaking the waters of the Pass is truly an adventure. Not a beginner paddle, the pass offers opportunities to paddle in strong currents and develop an appreciation for tidal influence.
 
Paddlers need to know how to read a tide chart and plan their excursion around the tidal currents. Currents in the Pass can get up to 8 knots. Some people feel it's similar to paddling a river. There are strong tide rips around the south side of Deception Island. But north and south of the Pass there is plenty of open water for easier paddling.
 
Caution: Deception Pass has a lot of motor boat traffic. Be aware of motor boats when crossing or playing in the current, otherwise stay close to the shoreline and explore the numerous coves.
 
If you are going through the Pass, most paddlers use the route between Pass Island and Fidalgo Island on the north side of the Pass (called Canoe Pass). Motor boat traffic is usually on the south side of the Pass.

Location: From Seattle, drive 64 miles north on Interstate 5 to exit 230 (Anacortes/Burlington). Turn west on State Highway 20 and drive about 12 miles to the Whidbey Island junction. Proceed about six miles south on State Highway 20 to the Deception Pass Bridge. Cross the bridge onto Whidbey Island and drive south down the hill and at the bottom take a right into the campground. Continue past Cranberry Lake to the day-use parking lot on the coast and the put-in.
 
For a map, pictures and more info click on Deception Pass


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Friday, August 21, 2009

Blodgett Overlook Trail

Hiking
Location: Near Hamilton, Montana
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~ 2.5 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Easy


The Blodgett Canyon Overlook trail is located on the edge of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, the third largest Wilderness in the Lower 48. This Wilderness forms a rugged, glacier-carved border between Idaho and Montana.

A vast wild land with some of the roughest mountain areas on earth. A country of high ridges dropping off into steep-walled canyons. This trip affords a spectacular peek into one of those canyons. Namely, Blodgett Canyon with some of the largest balolithic spires in the Northwest.
Blodgett Canyon is not only spectacular to view, but it’s considered a rock climber’s paradise with hundreds of climbs.

As for this trip, it's an easy 2.5 mile trail, which ends in an overlook of Blodgett Canyon. The trail and area surrounding it were burned in the 2000 fire season. In fact, it was the Lolo Hotshots that built the trail in the first place, back in 1993.

The fires have made it very interesting to visit and watch the forest recover naturally. There is abundance of wildlife ranging from Elk to Chipmunks, even woodpeckers that are utilizing the burned trees.

But the main reason for coming is the view. The overlook is, in my opinion, the 2nd best overlook in the country (Glacier Point, Yosemite is the best). There are three benches to rest on along the trail and mountain bikes are allowed.

Directions: Drive Southwest on US Highway 93 for about 44 miles and then turn right (West) onto Bowman Road at the cement plant. If you cross the silver bridge on Highway 93, you’ve gone too far. Go 0.6 miles on Bowman Road and turn left (South) onto Ricketts Road, stay on rickets Road for 2 miles, taking a 90-degree turn to a four-way intersection. Continue straight on what becomes Blodgett Camp Road for 4 miles to Blodgett Overlook Trailhead and Canyon Creek Trailhead. There are signs.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Blodgett Overlook Trail


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Blodgett Campground

Camping
Location: Near Hamilton, Montana
Duration: Varies
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: N/A
Difficulty: Easy


This campground is located at the base of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, the third largest Wilderness in the Lower 48. This Wilderness forms a rugged, glacier-carved border between Idaho and Montana.

The area is dominated by ridges broken up with raw granite peaks. Below the ridges are deep canyons covered with thick coniferous forest. This vast wild land is one of the roughest mountain areas on earth, a country of high ridges dropping off into steep-walled canyons. The barren peaks don't hint at the dense forests below, where a number of streams and more than 100 lakes offer excellent trout fishing and wildlife habitat.

Blodgett Campground is a small beautifully maintained campground with approximately ten sites. Each site offers a fire ring with a grill, picnic table, and parking. There’s one pit toilet, no water except for Blodgett Creek (so treat it) and all garbage must be packed out.

Being located just outside the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness affords numerous activities. There’s wonderful trout fishing in the creek, an easy trail that hikes up the magnificent Blodgett Canyon, which boasts some of the largest balolithic spires in the Northwest.

The campground may be used as a take off spot for a backpack trip up Blodgett Pass into the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness or as a base camp for any one of a hundred rock climbs. There are equestrian facilities and the trail is very horse friendly. Mountain bikes may only be taken up the trail to the wilderness boundary.

Camping, day use, and parking are free. There are bears in the area and they do frequent the campground, so as always keep a clean camp. The local bears still have fear of humans and quickly run away when you make your presence known. Also, fire restrictions may apply in late summer. Check the information board for any restrictions. This is a free campground with a five-day limit on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Directions: Drive Southwest on US Highway 93 for about 44 miles and then turn right (West) onto Bowman Road at the cement plant. If you cross the silver bridge on Highway 93, you’ve gone too far. Go 0.6 miles on Bowman Road and turn left (South) onto Ricketts Road, stay on rickets Road for 2 miles, taking a 90-degree turn to a four-way intersection. Continue straight on what becomes Blodgett Camp Road for 4 miles to Blodgett Campground and Trailhead. There are signs, however don’t take the left that leads to the Canyon Creek Trailhead.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Blodgett Campground


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Blodgett Canyon Trail

Hiking
Location: Near Hamilton, Montana
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~ 6 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Easy


This trip is located at the doorway of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, the third largest Wilderness in the Lower 48. This Wilderness forms a rugged, glacier-carved border between Idaho and Montana.

This vast wild land is one of the roughest mountain areas on earth, a country of high ridges dropping off into steep-walled canyons. The barren peaks don't hint at the dense forests below, where streams and lakes offer excellent trout fishing and wildlife habitat.

This trip affords a spectacular hike up one of those steep-walled canyons. Namely, Blodgett Canyon with some of the largest balolithic spires in the Northwest. The hike up Blodgett Creek offers an easy day trip up to the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness.

It follows a beautiful creek that is choked with waterfalls and beaver ponds. Probably the most attractive reason for hiking this trail is the beautiful views of the Blodgett Spires. There are six major rock formations that vary in height from 500 to 1,500 feet tall. Blodgett Canyon is not only spectacular to view, but it’s considered a rock climber’s paradise with the trail being the approach to hundreds of climbs.

There’s wonderful trout fishing in the creek, the trail is very horse friendly and mountain bikes can be taken up the trail to the wilderness boundary only.

Also, there are bears in the area and they do frequent the campground and trailhead. Although, the bears still have fear of humans and quickly run away when you make your presence known.

Directions: Drive Southwest on US Highway 93 for about 44 miles and then turn right (West) onto Bowman Road at the cement plant. If you cross the silver bridge on Highway 93, you’ve gone too far. Go 0.6 miles on Bowman Road and turn left (South) onto Ricketts Road, stay on rickets Road for 2 miles, taking a 90-degree turn to a four-way intersection. Continue straight on what becomes Blodgett Camp Road for 4 miles to Blodgett Campground and Trailhead. There are signs, however don’t take the left that leads to the Canyon Creek Trailhead.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Blodgett Canyon Trail


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Benham Falls to Dillion Falls

Hiking
Location: Deschutes River, Bend, Oregon
Duration: 1 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~4 miles, one way
Difficulty: Easy


The Deschutes River trail is 8.7 miles total and just minutes from Bend, OR. The trail has many access points (with bathrooms and parking) and follows the Deschutes River as it winds it's way down ancient lava canyons and through grassy meadows.

This trail is suitable for young and old, very well kept with wide paths, easy grades and many unique features including water falls and lava flows. Navigation is simple with the river serving as a reliable landmark.

There are numerous trails that come in to the main trail, but if you keep to the river there should be know problems. This trip documents the section between Benham Falls and Dillon Falls (approx. 4 miles).

You will need to shuttle if you plan a one-way trip, so drop a vehicle at Dillon Falls on your way in or for an even shorter hike you can come out at Slough picnic area and boat launch.
From Benham Falls parking lot it's a downhill grade that over looks the Falls and gradually flattens out as the trail winds it's way along the banks of the Deschutes River through roaring rapids.

After you pass the Slough Picnic area and access point, the trail winds through open meadows and woods along calmer sections of the river (many places to take a dip).
Pets are aloud on leash and the trail is shared use with mountain bikes and horses. Also, depending on the time of day and season, mosquitoes can be a problem on the lower sections, so bring bug juice.

Directions: From Bend drive west on the Cascades Lakes Highway 46 past the Inn at Seventh Mountain Resort and Golf Course to Highway 41. Take a left onto 41 (there's a Deschutes River Recreation sign at the turn) and drive 3.4 miles to the Dillon Falls turn off sign, take a left and drive down to the parking lot and drop one car. From Dillon Falls get back on 41 and continue down 1 more mile to the turn off for Benham Falls, take a left, go past Slough and the road ends at Benham Falls parking lot.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Benham Falls to Dillion Falls


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Monday, August 17, 2009

Big Pine Campground

Camping
Location: Near Superior, Montana
Duration: Varies
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: N/A
Difficulty: Easy


Big Pine campground is located in the Lolo National Forest of western Montana. At 2.1 million acres of spectacular mountainous country, this forest is estimated to be the third largest National Forest in the northern region of the USDA Forest Service and contains several major tributaries to the Clark Fork River of the Columbia River Basin.
 
Big Pine campground is located on the banks of one of these tributaries, known as Fish Creek. With excellent fishing opportunities, Fish Creek is a beautiful clear mountain creek that runs right through the back of this campground.
 
A medium size campground, Big Pine not only has Fish Creek running through it, it's also home to the largest Ponderosa Pine in the continental US. Hence, the name Big Pine.
 
Finally, the location of this campground makes for easy access to numerous outdoor resources including the Clark Fork River with opportunities for fishing and water sports such as whitewater rafting, not to mention the numerous hiking and biking trails in the forests nearby.
 
As for the camping, this medium sized campground has numerous campsites with fire rings, tables and one restroom. There are both large group sites in the open meadow and small individual sites in the trees, backed right up to Fish Creek.
 
This campground is not handicap accessible and is classified as a tent campground because of the lack of power hookups for trailers. There's a gravel road through the campground and all campsites are on a first-come, first-served basis (no reservations).
 
One benefit to this spot is that there are no fees, but being free with no reservations, also means you will need to get there early if you want one of the more coveted sites next to the creek. So, if you're looking for a campground where you can raft, kayak, fly-fish, swim or just check out one big tree, this is the place.
 
Directions: Follow I-90 about 20 miles East of Superior, MT (or 40 miles West of Missoula) and take exit #66, right after I-90 crosses over the Clark Fork River as your heading East. Then head South for about 1 mile until you hit the first fork in the road, you can go either right or left, both will get you down to Fish Creek (left is shorter). Now, follow the road for another 2 miles until you come to a "T" in the road at Fish Creek. Either way you go, when you get to Fish Creek, turn left or East and follow the dirt road for about 1 mile as it winds along Fish Creek to the campground turn-off sign. The sign will be on your right side towards the creek.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Big Pine Campground


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:


Delivered by FeedBurner

Saturday, August 15, 2009

New Port Rhode Island RV Campgrounds

A campervan, or recreational vehicle, custom-b...Image via Wikipedia

by Morgan Lee

Are you planning to go to a camping Holiday? Have you decided where to camp this year? Well, if you haven't, then I would suggest you to visit the fabulous Newport city in Rhode Island! Newport draws huge number of visitors every year because of its' astonishing natural beauty, exhilarating beaches, culture, luxury, history and the charm of New England.

If you are planning a vacation trip then you must surely visit this city because it amazingly well organized campgrounds and RV parks where you can enjoy numerous leisure activities like hiking, biking, nature tours, exotic beaches, swimming boating, trekking and picnics. So, now let
me tell you about some cool campgrounds which you can easily locate here.

1. Whippoorwill Hill Family Campground This is one of the most magnificent campgrounds of Newport, where you may spend a calm and relaxing camping vacation with your family. Some of the amenities offered include mini-golf, laundry, fun dances, camp store, dump station, modern rest rooms, game rooms, fireplaces, picnic tables and full hook-ups for your RV.

2. Timber Creek RV Resort The Timer Creek RV Resort is conveniently located in Newport, Rhode Island and offers cool amenities to all the visitors. Some of the facilities provided at the park include volleyball field, and golf driving range, swimming pool, laundry facilities restrooms
and a general store. I am sure that you will adore this RV resort.

3. Melville Campground This fabulous campground is dotted by ponds, brooks and amazing wetlands. This campground boasts of providing spacious sites for your RV or tent, and is comfortably situated just few minutes away from the historic Newport and area beaches. You will find loads of opportunities for bird watching, fishing and hiking in this camp park.

4. Wooden Pond Family Campground Wooden Pond Family Campground is owned and operated by a family for the last 33 years. It will provide you with the best camping services and experiences in the Rhode Island. You may spend a lazy day on the beach, simply swim around or build sand castles with your family member or friends.

These are some of the most beautiful campgrounds near Newport, Rhode Island. These campsites are very cool and offer the all amenities for your camping vacation.

Read more about Camping & RV Parks directory. Going to California (Northern)? Know all California (Northern) RV Parks

See you on the trail,
--Greg

Good Sam Extended Service Plan RV Warranty


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Friday, August 14, 2009

Mountain Bike Cycling For Beginners - Getting Started

Dirt Series Women's Mountain Bike ClinicImage by richardmasoner via Flickr

By Johno Altamiruno

Mountain bike cycling is the most easily accessible form of cycling and it is open to everyone to have a go. It's good for keeping fit while taking you away from the noise and grind of everyday life.

Mountain bike cycling is usually done off-road, which means in the countryside, on bridleways and allotted cycle trails, and sometimes on more difficult technical trails. It's important to practice your skills first before you go on difficult technical trails though.

To improve your riding skills the best thing you can do is practice a lot. It can be helpful sometimes to watch more experienced riders to pick up tips, or even watch DVD's but the most helpful thing is definitely practice.

Before you can start practicing you obviously need a mountain bike, so deciding which one should you get is the first task. There are numerous different sorts of bikes available, varying widely in price and style. If you are just starting it's a good idea to go for a less expensive model until you gain experience and decide where you like riding the most.

Once you have your bike you'll need to get some suitable clothes to wear to ride it. Mountain bikers usually go for a fairly casual look, such as baggy shorts. You can get specialist mountain bike shorts that look like ordinary shorts but they have a padded lining for comfort on a bike.

There are several items that are essential to wear when mountain bike cycling, at all times, whatever the weather or trail. These are gloves, glasses and a helmet. They are safety equipment to protect you from flying debris, such as stones and mud, low hanging and prickly branches, and falls.

You will no doubt have some minor falls, as these are part and parcel of mountain bike cycling. However if you wear the essential protective gear you will most likely only suffer minor injuries, like bruises and grazes.

When you've got all the appropriate gear you'll have to think of where to go mountain bike cycling. There are plenty of guides to local areas available from bike shops, book shops or on the internet, and you can get really good local information from Visitor Information Centers locally. There are even some allocated mountain bike centers run by the Forestry Commission with marked bike trails for different abilities.

When you've got your bike, your safety gear and some ideas of where to cycle you are ready to go! A little knowledge of some basic mountain bike maintenance would also be an advantage but the most important thing now is to get out and enjoy the adrenalin rush you get from mountain bike cycling.

About the Author:

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Deschutes River Trail

Mountain Biking
Location:
Deschutes River Bend, Oregon
Duration:
1 Day
Season:
Spring - Fall
Distance:
~17 miles, round trip
Difficulty:
Easy



The Deschutes River Trail is single track riding, approximately 17 miles round trip and just minutes from Bend, OR. The trail makes a 975ft. elevation gain one-way, has many access points (with bathrooms and parking) and follows the Deschutes River as it winds it's way through ancient lava canyons and grassy meadows.

This trail is suitable for beginner to expert riders, very well kept with wide paths, easy grades and many unique features including water falls, lava flows, and swimming holes.

Navigation is simple with the river serving as a reliable landmark. There are numerous trails that come in to the main trail, but if you keep to the river there should be know problems.

Pets are allowed on leash and the trail is shared use with hikers and horses, so be careful on corners and as you pass. Also, depending on the time of day and season, mosquitoes can be a problem on the lower sections, so bring bug juice or ride fast.

Directions: From Bend, Oregon drive west on the Cascades Lakes Highway 46 (approx. 6 miles) Take a left before the Golf Course and drive to the Meadow Picnic Area.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Deschutes River Trail

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Mountain Biking In Alaska

Matanuska Valley, Matanuska GlacierImage via Wikipedia

By PJ Williams

Biking in Alaska isnt for the faint of heart. Theres wildlife to contend with, high altitudes that can make any task seem daunting, and more natural obstacles then you can imagine. However, there is also some of the most incredible scenery as well as a challenging ride to be enjoyed.

For beginners, there's the Eklutna Lake trail, about 14 miles of rolling terrain going around a beautiful lake. Fair warning - it's up in the mountains, so it can still be cold, even in late summer, when the sun goes down (finally). Keep your camera handy for bears and other wildlife, and the lake is gorgeous!

The Gull Rock Trail is a 10-mile track near Hope, Alaska. There are some large rocks and roots to keep you on your toes. Otherwise, its a pretty gentle trail, but you can work up quite a bit of speed at times. The best time to ride is in late spring and early summer. By late summer, much of the trail gets rather overgrown with foliage.

The Centenial Park from Muldoon to Stuckagain is located near Anchorage. There many trails to choose from in this 12-mile section of track. Because of the good variety of trails, theres something here for any skill level. A few things you might want to check out during your ride: the Ship Creek dam and reservoir and an old rope swing off the hill. There is a military training camp near North Muldoon so be careful in this area.

The other major mountain biking locale in the Anchorage area is the Hilltop Ski Area. It's got 9 miles of steep climbs and awesome descents. While it's close to Anchorage, keep an eye out for wildlife and other trail users. Side trails may be better for beginners, but the main trails are great for adrenaline seekers.

The essential long haul, "I can't believe we made it" Alaska biking trail is Resurrection Pass Trail near Hope, Alaska. It's got a 40 mile wooded track at high altitude, with lots of steep, technical sections and some challenging downhill areas. You'll want to keep an eye out for obstacles, as this is not manicured in any way shape or form, and it's worth it to do this one with a buddy or two and some tents and make a weekend camping run out of it.

Going a little farther north to the Matanuska-Susitna valley is Silver Creek Trail, outside of Wasilla. Mostly for ATVs, the trail is 4 miles of challenging course, that will take you over the tree line. It's got a great view, but keep an eye out for inclement weather; like in the Rockies, weather can change fast.

Hopefully you have found something here to whet your appetite for all that Alaska has to offer the adventurous mountain biker. Expect the ride of a lifetime!

About the Author:


See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Monday, August 10, 2009

Colchuck Lake

Backpacking
Location: Alpine Lakes Wilderness, Washington
Duration: 2-3 Day
Season: Spring - Fall
Distance: ~9 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Moderate


Colchuck Lake is found in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area. An area located in the rugged Central Cascades Region of Washington State. Alpine Lakes Wilderness encompasses approximately 394,000 acres accessed by 47 trailheads and 615 miles of trails.

The name Alpine Lakes takes its origin from the nearly 700 small mountain lakes nestled like jewels among the high rocky peaks and timbered valleys of the region. Colchuck Lake is one of those jewels and located within the borders of this great wilderness.

From the trailhead at 3400 feet, the trail climbs through the forest along side Mountaineer Creek for the first mile. You should start to feel the elevation gain as it switchbacks to a junction at 2 1/2 miles (4,500 feet). At the junction, the trail to the right goes to Lake Stuart (5,064 feet). For Colchuck Lake, continue left and cross Mountaineer Creek where you can catch a nice view of Mt. Stewart to the South.

After the junction, the trail then climbs through open forest with granite knolls providing hikers with opportunities to grab a snack and/or enjoy the view, weather permitting. Soon, the trail should pass a waterfall and then continue to climb to Colchuck Lake at 5,570 feet.

There are several designated campsites and toilets nearby. The hike to the lake is ~4.5 miles, one way. Note: Above the head of the lake is Aasgard Pass, a shortcut into the Enchantment Lakes Basin, but it's not for inexperienced hikers: The route is steep and hazardous.

Regulations to be aware of are that campfires are prohibited above 5000 feet elevation, dogs are not allowed, permits are required and group size is limited to twelve (12) in most areas. The Enchantments have a party size limit of eight (8).

Directions: From Leavenworth, WA, On the west outskirt of town, turn right on Icicle Creek Road and drive 8.5 miles to Forest Service road No. 7601, which turns off to the left, just past Eightmile Creek Campground. Drive four miles to the trailhead parking lot, elevation approximately 3,500 feet.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Colchuck Lake

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"
Enter your email address:


Delivered by FeedBurner
Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Friday, August 7, 2009

Great Alabama Bike Trails

A hardtail mountain bike.Image via Wikipedia

By PJ Williams

Alabama has excellent bike riding trails. The terrain can vary from steep mountain downhills, to thick forests and everything in between. Alabama makes for great family getaways because there is something for every skill level. Below are some of my favorite Alabama bike trails.

Just outside of Mobile is South Alabama, which has an excellent trail for beginners and experienced riders alike. This is a fifteen mile loop, combined with a smaller seven mile loop. They have quick rolling hills where you will grab some speed on the downhills. These trails are popular so lookout for other riders and hikers. They are also very well maintained so treat them with care.

Oak Mountain State Park has some of the very best riding in the state of Alabama. Theres something here for everyone. Its located near Birmingham and does require a small admission fee. There are lots of trails ranging from tight and technical to roller coaster downhill sections in the parks 20 miles of track. Advanced riders will want to look for Blood Rock. This is the most technical part of the track.

Wetumpka, Alabama has the Swayback Bridge Trail. It is a small twelve mile loop that can get pretty tough to climb but is a fantastically fun ride. The rocks and exposed roots will keep you on your game but the speed you can get will make you feel like a kid again. You may want to enjoy the early morning at Lake Jordan and show up in mid morning after the other bikers have battled the spider webs that sprung up overnight.

Hurricane Creek Park near Cullman, Alabama has approximately 8 miles of steep and technical trails. There is a small, deep canyon on several hundred acres of land. Expect a lot of freestyle riding. Full suspension is a plus. If youre not completely worn out from riding hard, theres plenty of gorgeous scenery to enjoy as well.

Montesano State Park near Huntsville, Alabama is 30 miles of twisting, rocky trails that follow the contours of the mountains. There are some trails that are not designated for bikes, but they should be well-marked. Theres a family trail for easier riding, but most of the trails require advanced skills. Youll enjoy some fantastic downhill sections here as well.

The Colonial Hills ORV is also near Huntsville and is for the extremely skilled biker. It is well-loved by dirt bikes especially. There are several long climbs in the 15 miles of track, but you are then rewarded with the most incredible descents youve ever experienced! Keep a watch out for the stumps at the bottom though. There are also some rocky, technical sections as well.

Thanks to Alabamas mild winters, cyclists and mountain bikers can enjoy riding all year round. The state parks in Alabama are especially popular places to ride throughout the year. No matter where you go, be sure to keep hydrated and be safe! Happy trails!

About the Author:

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Crystal Lake

Backpacking
Location: Near Cataldo, Idaho
Duration: 2-3 Day
Season: Summer - Fall
Distance: ~ 3 miles, round trip
Difficulty: Easy


Located in the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, a land of dense forests, abundant wildlife and scenic mountains is Crystal Lake (5300 feet). This trip documents a nice little backpacking trip, along a scenic trail to a high mountain lake. A lake that is only accessible by foot, which makes for great fishing and low crowds.

As for the trail, it makes approximately a 400ft elevation gain over ~ ¾ of a mile and then descending another 500ft over another ~ ¾ of a mile to the lake, making this trip approximately 3 miles round-trip for a nice short 2-day backpacking trip.

There are plenty of primitive campsites along the shores of the lake and the mountain views are great, also if you like to fish hangout longer.

On the trail, you start out on an old jeep trail, which climbs the ridge and then at the fork in the trail turns into a single trail again. From here the trail side-hills through open meadows with great views, until it tucks back into the woods as it reaches the saddle.

At the saddle the trail will turn and descend 500ft to the lake below with views of the lake from the trail.

Directions: From I-90 (25 miles east of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho) take the Cataldo Exit #40 and head south on 205 the Latour Creek/Rochat Divide Road for approximately 22 miles to the saddle at the base of St. Joe Baldy Peak and the trailhead. From the exit off I-90, the road will travel for about two miles, where it will then meet up with Latour Creek and follow it for about 10 miles. The last 10 miles, the road will climb up the mountains away from the creek and to the divide, past Rochat Peak, ending up on the saddle between St Joe Baldy and Pearson Peak. Park in the pullout and the trailhead is opposite St Joe Baldy Peak, right over the dirt and rock mound.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Crystal Lake

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Eagle Cap Wilderness

Backpacking
Location: Eagle Cap Wilderness, Oregon
Duration: 3-4 Day
Season: Summer - Fall
Distance: ~24 miles, Round-trip
Difficulty: Moderate


The Eagle Cap Wilderness lies in the heart of the Wallowa Mountains in Northeastern Oregon on the Wallowa -Whitman National Forest. It was the summer home to the Joseph Band of the Nez Perce tribe and was used as hunting grounds for bighorn sheep, deer and to gather huckleberries.

The Wilderness Act of 1964 placed the area in the National Wilderness Preservation System. It was enlarged through the years and now totals 361,446 acres of Wilderness. The Eagle Cap Wilderness is characterized by high alpine lakes and meadows, bare granite peaks, and U-shaped glaciated valleys. The Wilderness has an array of exquisite wildflowers, small groves of old growth forest, and a variety of interesting wildlife.

In the summer months, white-tailed deer, mule deer, and Rocky Mountain elk roam the Wilderness. Black bears are seen on occasion eating huckleberries and cougars hide out among the rocky outcroppings. On rare occasions, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep or mountain goats can be seen, not to mention the smaller mammals that inhabit the area year-round including pine martens, badgers, squirrels, and marmots.

As for fowls, keep your eyes to the air for falcon, woodpecker, bald eagle, golden eagle, ferruginous hawk, or the gray-crowned rosy finch. Plants range from low elevation grasslands and ponderosa pine forest to alpine meadows. Across the meadows you might spot a variety of Indian Paintbrush, Foregt-me-nots, Columbine, Larkspur, Cow Parsnip, and Mountain Bluebells.

As for the trail, the West Fork Wallowa River Trail follows the river to its headwaters at Frazier and Glacier Lakes. From the trailhead, stay right and follow the sign marked West Fork Wallowa River Trail #1820. The first ¾ mile section of trail is steep and junctions with Joseph Mountain Trail. After passing the Wilderness Boundary sign at ~1 mile, the remaining ~2 miles to the Ice Lake junction is less strenuous with good views of Craig Mountain and the river (Note: there are 3 good campsites with water available at the junction).

It's another ~3 miles to Six Mile Meadow gaining a total of 1,200ft in elevation from the trailhead and finally leveling out ~1 mile before the meadow (Note: at Six Mile Meadow a person can usually find good access for fishing the West Fork Wallowa River for Brook and Rainbow trout). At the beginning of Six Mile Meadow, there's a trail junction for Lakes Basin Trail #1810 to Horseshoe Lake, stay left on the West Fork Wallowa River Trail #1820.

The West Fork Trail continues South from Six Mile Meadow up the valley toward Frazier Lake gaining another 1,200ft in elevation, over the next 4 miles. As you continue South, the trail travels through a narrowing canyon along the river, passing through dense forests interspersed with openings created by past avalanches. One of those openings, approximately 2 miles up the trail is a large avalanche meadow with the junction for the Polaris Pass Trail. Stay right at the junction to continue up to Frazier Lake.

After the junction the trail enters the forest again and skirts the edge of a narrow gorge. Soon you will enter the high country with impressive limestone cliffs and sub-alpine meadows sprinkled with wildflowers. Note: keep your eyes open for bighorn sheep and mountain goats on the cliffs above.

1 mile before Frazier Lake the trail will cross the river. There's no bridge here, so you will need to ford the river (Note: depending on if it's still there, you might find a log across the river about 200 yards downstream, cross with caution).

Camping is available at Frazier Lake. Beyond Frazier Lake, it's another 800ft in elevation over 2 miles to Glacier Lake and well worth the hike. Also, a nice side trip is the trail to Little Frazier Lake and Prospect Lake, two beautiful alpine lakes only a little over a mile away. Fishing is good in most lakes and the West Fork Wallowa River.

Camping sites abound, but make sure you follow the forest service regulations and avoid camping within 200ft of the shorelines for all lakes. Bears are common, so hang your food and follow bear country precautions, not to mention the squirrels and chipmunks like to get into things also.

Directions: From Joseph Oregon, drive South on Highway 82 following the signs ~6 miles to the far end of Wallowa Lake. At the end of the lake, turn left at the junction in the road and follow Powerhouse Road 1 mile to the end of the pavement and parking area. A parking permit is required (see the link below for more info). The trailhead is located about 200ft up the hill and to the left of the powerhouse.

For a map, pictures and more info click on Eagle Cap Wilderness - Frazier and Glacier Lakes

See you on the trail,
--Greg

All Day Energy Runners


"Please notify me of any new Trails"

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner